Strategies for Effective Co-Parenting

 

 Co-Parenting pic

Co-Parenting
Image: thespruce.com

As a privately practicing psychologist, Dr. Miriam Galindo has offered counseling in co-parenting to many families as they go through divorce. Dr. Miriam Galindo has also worked with the court system as a custody evaluator and co-leads family reunification and co-parenting courses through the Families in Transition program.

Co-parenting can be both emotionally and logistically difficult, as it requires two people to put aside a challenging and potentially intense history to make important decisions together. To succeed, the two parties must commit to open communication that is focused entirely on the children. This means finding a different outlet for frustrations about the other parent, particularly in conversations that the children may encounter.

When children are in earshot, parents must be careful to speak only in positive ways about the other parent. This guideline is applicable when speaking to the children as well as to the other parent, who is likely to be more receptive to parenting discussions if he or she does not feel accused or put down.

Meanwhile, it is important for co-parents to keep rules and expectations consistent across households. This provides the children with a crucial sense of stability and keeps them from taking advantage of what they may perceive as an unstable parenting situation.

Children will, however, be aware that things are different. Parents should answer their questions as freely as possible, when it is age-appropriate, and reassure them about things such as when they will change houses and whether the family dog will change houses with them.

Advertisements

Keep Families Talking to Support Success in Family Therapy

 

Family Therapy pic

Family Therapy
Image: everydayhealth.com

Dr. Miriam Galindo offers clients at her Irvine, California, private practice a supportive atmosphere focused on their individual needs. Licensed as both a social worker and a psychologist, Dr. Miriam Galindo has worked closely with Southern California courts as an expert panelist, and has handled numerous cases involving divorce, custody, and family therapy.

Family therapy brings together all members of a family group in an effort to help them communicate more effectively with one another, handle interpersonal stresses better, and learn from and resolve differences.

A psychologist or clinical social worker is typically the professional providing family therapy, which needs to be crafted to accommodate each family’s unique circumstances. This is particularly important, experts say, because each family is, in effect, a social ecosystem of its own.

Studies have indicated that patients who talk more among themselves, and with their therapist, are more likely to remain in therapy for an effective length of time, and to have more successful outcomes. Experts advise family therapists to make sure to help parents find ways to talk through their issues more openly in therapy and to feel included and valued in the therapeutic process.

Membership Categories Offered by the AFCC

Association of Family and Conciliation Courts pic

Association of Family and Conciliation Courts
Image: afccnet.org

Dr. Miriam Galindo, a licensed psychologist and social worker in California, belongs to a panel of experts who work with families involved in high-conflict divorce cases in Orange County Superior Court. Active in her professional community, Dr. Miriam Galindo is a member of the Association of Family and Conciliation Courts (AFCC).

The premier association for professionals involved in resolving family conflicts, the AFCC maintains several basic membership categories. Four of these categories are:

1. Individual – Open to professionals and others interested in the resolution of family conflicts, individual memberships cost $160 a year. All members within this category receive a subscription to the Family Court Review and AFCC eNEWS. Members also receive reduced rates for AFCC conference registration.

2. Institutional – At $390 per year, institutional memberships are designed for courts, mental health practices, private law practices, and government and community agencies. Full member benefits are granted to three individuals, and these benefits can be shared with other members of the same organization.

3. Retired – Active AFCC members who have been part of the organization for five consecutive years but are no longer earning income from work related to family resolution are eligible for a retired membership. Retired members receive all the benefits awarded to individual members but pay only $80 per year in dues.

4. Student – For the discounted membership price of $25 a year, full-time students enrolled in accredited institutions can join the AFCC. Student members receive the same benefits as individuals, but students receive electronic-only access to the Family Court Review.

CSULB School of Social Work’s Simulation Lab

CSULB pic

CSULB
Image: web.csulb.edu

Licensed in clinical psychology and social work, Dr. Miriam Galindo and her husband run a private practice in Irvine, California. For close to a decade she was a social worker at Olive Crest in Santa Ana. Dr. Miriam Galindo holds a master of social work from California State University, Long Beach (CSULB).

As noted by the School of Social Work at CSULB, social workers are unsung heroes. They may work in unfamiliar environments for long hours, just part of their normal work day. To help better prepare the next generation of social workers, the school established a simulation laboratory located at the Social Work Student Center.

The lab is a simulated home where faculty, consultants, and other experts work together to help train social work interns. Various scenarios are acted out, and there is always a mentor or coach in the scene who provides a prompt assessment of the scene and the action of the interns. The lab is a secure location where students can hone their skills before going out into the real world and meeting the families that may require their assistance.

NACCFI’s Forensic Interviewing of Children Course

National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers  pic

National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers
Image: naccfi.com

Dr. Miriam Galindo holds a master of social work from California State University, Long Beach, and a doctor of psychology from Trinity College of Graduate Studies. Throughout her career as licensed clinical social worker and psychologist, Dr. Miriam Galindo has completed a number of continuing education and advanced training programs, including Forensic Interviewing of Children through the National Association of Certified Child Forensic Interviewers (NACCFI).

A self-paced e-learning course, Forensic Interviewing of Children is designed to help professionals learn the proper procedures and interview techniques involved in effectively questioning children, whether they are victims or witnesses of a crime.

Analyzed and reviewed by more than 1,500 practicing child forensic interviewers, the Forensic Interviewing of Children course features 40 hours of online training designed as part of the curriculum needed to qualify for child forensic interviewer certification. Other portions of the curriculum include 16 hours of peer review practicum and 32 hours of competency training.

Child Custody Evaluations in California

Dr. Miriam Galindo pic

Dr. Miriam Galindo
Image: galindopsychology.com

A licensed clinical psychologist, Dr. Miriam Galindo holds a doctor of psychology from Trinity College of Graduate Studies. Dr. Miriam Galindo runs a private practice in Irvine, California, where she conducts child custody evaluations.

In California, parents who go through a divorce often have to undergo a child custody evaluation, or a 730 Evaluation. While judges sometimes order these evaluations for concerns related to substance abuse or child abuse, they also order them when parents simply cannot come to an agreement on custody.

A 730 Evaluation may be conducted by four types of professionals in California: psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and marriage and family therapists. If the parents cannot agree on an evaluator, the judge either chooses one or requires the parents to submit a list of potential evaluators. The professional conducting the evaluation assesses the parenting practices and mental health of both parents in order to inform the judge’s orders related to custody and visitation.

Social, Cultural, and Economic Influences on Child Psychology

Dr. Miriam Galindo pic

Dr. Miriam Galindo
Image: galindopsychology.com

Dr. Miriam Galindo serves as a licensed clinical social worker and a licensed clinical psychologist. As a result, Dr. Miriam Galindo has experience with the discipline of child psychology.

A rich field of study, child psychology deals with growth and development. Its practitioners differ as to the importance of various factors in explaining a child’s personality. Although most people look to genetics and personality to account for children’s feelings and actions, several other domains also play a part.

In the social sphere, schools, peers, and families all play a role in a child’s development. Relationships play a role in molding how a child learns and thinks.

Culture is also important. Cultural identity is a factor in making assumptions about the world and sharing customs and values. It also influences children’s relationships with parents, levels of educational attainment, and standards of child care.

Additionally, socio-economic status (SES) has a strong influence on children. Its aspects include family income, level of schooling, types of jobs held, and the quality of the neighborhood. Children who are high SES typically have better access to healthcare and nutrition than children on the lower end of the economic ladder.

These three domains interact with one another. For instance, healthy relationships and a vibrant culture may compensate for a low-SES situation. Properly understood, these concepts can help child psychologists determine the best treatments for their young patients.